A quick word on a tragedy

At the back of my parents’ attic, in a box marked “Ed,” is my first year 5 assignment, an A3 poster titled “All About Me.” In the middle of the page my eleven-year old self had written, by way of introduction and in handwriting not all that different from today’s, a line repeated by millions of Australian children.

When I grow up, I want to play cricket for Australia.

As a kid, like so many other Australians, I lived for the game. When it wasn’t a match it was a net session, or a hit in the backyard, or in the kitchen, or in the bedroom with a little autograph bat signed by the New South Wales team. If it wasn’t a game it was catching practice, or training, or sitting around with the old man discussing tactics and field placements, or helping my grandpa roll the pitch and paint the lines for Christmas Eve. At other times, of course, it was lying in bed listening to Jim Maxwell and Henry Blofeld and Peter Roebuck and Harsha Bhogle, or sitting and reading until memorised that little blue bible, The Laws of Cricket.

There were thousands of us, and he was one of us. Every player who has ever gone on to play for Australia, any player who has gone on to play Sheffield Shield, was one of us. The game is so complex, so rich, so imbued with history, that you can’t just play it. You have to live it. Phil Hughes lived it, as so many of us have lived it. He was better than us, he was braver, he was more determined, and he was the one who made it, and was going to make it again.

His death hits me hard because he remained, till his very last day, one of us. As good as he was, he remained defined by how good he could become.

That eleven year old kid wouldn’t have cared for celebrity girlfriends, fancy cars and a free ride from the selectors. He would have wanted be brilliant, to be unique, to be strong, to be loved by his teammates, to be respected by his opponents, and to score runs for fun. He would have wanted to be Phil Hughes.

Another letter to the PM

Dear Prime Minister,

Last week I received an invitation from your education minister Christopher Pyne to sign a petition about the cuts which your government has caused at the ABC. Mr Pyne’s contention was that the power of the people ought to be listened to by the people in power, and that a petition signed by a significant number of people should have been cause for the ABC to reconsider its planned cuts to its Adelaide staff. Mr Pyne’s petition had an original goal of 500 signatures, suggesting that he thought 500 signatures to be a number sufficient to cause a rethink on the part of the ABC executive. As the petition attracted more and more media coverage and attention, Mr Pyne increased the goal of his petition to 1000, then 1500, then 2000, then 2500, then finally to 5000. So far he has achieved just under 3000 signatures.

On Nov 19, Mr Pyne tweeted, “We’ve hit 200! Thanks to all for kindly helping to promote my petition to stop ABC Board from cutting SA production. ”

Later that same day he tweeted, “Great response! 1000 people have joined me in wanting ABC production to remain in SA.”

On Nov 20, Mr Pyne tweeted, “.@mscott hasn’t responded to my 2 letters from Aug & Oct.Maybe James Spigelman will respond to the 2100+ petitioners?”

Today, Mr Pyne wrote to Mark Scott and James Spiegelman AC QC asking that they reconsider their recent decisions, noting as evidence in his favour that “over 2500 people have joined me in supporting ABC South Australia’s future.”

In light of the above, my questions to you are as follows:

1. What does your government think of the petition at https://www.change.org/p/the-liberal-party-of-australia-reconsider-your-plan-for-a-fttn-nbn-in-favour-of-a-superior-ftth-nbn? Just in case Joe “eleventy” Hockey is doing the maths, or Malcolm “inventor of the internet” Turnbull is driving the mousey thing, I’ll copy and paste the number of signatures into this email, to make it easier for you to read.


Just in case you are actually reading this yourself, and not having it read to you, I’ll spell it out in words in case they are a bit too big to understand.

Two hundred and seventy two thousand and thirty four.

2. Are you excited at the prospect of being voted out at the next election, and becoming the first first-term federal government in forty years?

3. Does it make you happy to have to employ extra public servants just to read letters like this?

I would particularly like a reply to question 3, as it will help me decide how to frame my future correspondence. I would appreciate a reply via Australia Post, because I would be proud to own something with your signature on it, and because while we’re throwing money at the miners, the polluters and the tax dodgers we may as well throw some at the posties as well.

Kind Regards,